Coronavirus in Texas: Houston church closes doors again after five leaders test positive

Coronavirus in Texas: Houston church closes doors again after five leaders test positive

A women has her nails painted at Kosmo Salon in Corpus Christi after it reopened for business. Barbershops and nail salons reopened May 8 as part of Gov. Greg Abbott's plan for the Texas economy.
A women has her nails painted at Kosmo Salon in Corpus Christi after it reopened for business. Barbershops and nail salons reopened May 8 as part of Gov. Greg Abbott’s plan for the Texas economy.
Courtney Sacco/Caller-Times via REUTERS

Tuesday’s biggest developments

  • Five leaders at a Houston church have tested positive for the new coronavirus

Houston church closes doors again after five leaders test positive

[5 a.m.] Holy Ghost Catholic Church in Houston closed its doors after five leaders tested positive for the new coronavirus over the weekend, the Houston Chronicle reports. Holy Ghost resumed limited Masses three weeks ago, according to the Chronicle, and the church said in a statement that two of the five leaders who tested positive are priests who were active in those services.

The Rev. Donnell Kirchner, another church leader, died May 13 after being diagnosed with pneumonia, according to the Chronicle. Kirchner received the pneumonia diagnosis at an urgent care clinic, the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston said, and it’s unclear whether he was tested for the new coronavirus before he returned to the home where he lived with seven other members of a religious order.

Texas reports 48,693 cases and 1,347 deaths

[5 a.m.] Texas is expected to release updated coronavirus figures Tuesday afternoon. On Monday, the state reported 909 more cases of the new coronavirus, an increase of about 2% over the previous day, bringing the total number of known cases to 48,693. The state also reported 11 additional deaths, bringing the statewide total to 1,347 — an increase of about 1% from Sunday. See maps of the latest case numbers for each county and case rates per 1,000 residents. — Anna Novak


Source: Texas Tribune

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

code